TUTBURY CASTLE FIREWORKS

WHAT: TUTBURY CASTLE FIREWORKS 2019
WHAT: FIREWORKS EVENT
WHERE: TUTBURY CASTLE, CASTLE STREET, TUTBURY, STAFFORDSHIRE DE13 9JF
WHEN: SUNDAY 3RD NOVEMBER 2019
COST: ADULTS £9.00/  CHILDREN UNDER 12 – £8.00/UNDER 5’S FREE

Tonight, there will be a classic fireworks event at Tutbury Castle.

They have been holding this event for several years and it attracts huge numbers of spectators to witness both the Vikings and the beautiful fireworks. The gates open at 5.30pm and wellies and thick coats are highly recommended.

Please be warned, Tutbury Castle is a scheduled monument, which means you should expect un-even and slippery surfaces with steep stairs and slopes.

Entertainment includes fire breathing performances, a firework display, Viking battle and funeral pyre and a small Viking encampment. There will be hot food and drink concessions and a licensed bar, but you should expect large queues. The car parking costs just £1.00.

Entertainment will be taking place throughout the evening and the Viking show provides an educational and accurate portrayal of the period.

Tutbury Castle is a largely ruined Medieval Castle at Tutbury, Staffordshire. The castle’s origins go right back to the early 11th century, but by the middle of the 14th century, major repair works had to be undertaken following attacks on the castle from all approaches. The castle was gifted originally by William the Conqueror, after he beat Harold at the Battle of Hastings, to one of his Knights; Hugh d’Avranches. At the time, there was little evidence of what would later become the full castle and its crenelated fortressing was added as the years passed and the castle was passed through concurrent knights of William, the Norman King.

During it’s very rich history, the castle played host to James 1st, Henry IV, Henry VI and Henry VIII , Charles I and in much later years, our very own Queen Elizabeth II and Prince Philip. One of the most notable royals to grace the grounds of Tutbury was Mary Queen of Scots who arrived at the castle, a prisoner of Queen Elizabeth I, on 4th February 1569. She absolutely hated it there as it was cold, damp and draughty so she spent a great deal of time in front of a fire reading, writing and creating some delightful embroidery, some of which she sent to Elizabeth as peace offerings in an attempt to soothe some of the tension which had been created between them – all of course to no avail.

Gates open from 3pm and the beautiful firework display will run for around 16 minutes.

Get along and show your support.

Share