Tag Archives: malta

Malta international fireworks festival next week

The skies over the Grand Harbour will once again be ablaze with the colours of various fireworks displays. The eighth edition of the Malta International Fireworks Festival organised by the Parliamentary Secretariat for Tourism and the Malta Tourism Authority, will be taking place on Thursday, 30 April and Friday, 1 May. This spectacular festival also serves as part of the commemorative events to celebrate the fifth anniversary of Malta’s accession into the European Union.

Twelve local fireworks factories and three foreign companies, will provide the fireworks displays over the two evenings. The festival will kick off on each evening at 9.30pm with a 15-minute fireworks display, designed by a foreign pyrotechnic company. This will be followed by a set of fireworks displays from the local factories in a one by one competitive series of displays. This is meant to involve, more than ever before, the local pyrotechnic enthusiasts. For each category, there is a trophy as well as prize money to be won. A fireworks display synchronised to music will close each evening’s event. Ta’ Liesse/Barriera Wharf, as well as the upper reaches of the bastions that surround Malta’s capital, with their commanding views over Grand Harbour, are the best locations for viewing the displays.

The participating local firework factories are: Lily Fireworks Factory – Mqabba, Lourdes Fireworks Factory – Naxxar, Mt Carmel Fireworks Factory – Zurrieq, Our Lady of Consolation Fireworks Factory – Gudja, San Bastjan Fireworks Factory – Qormi, San Bert Fireworks Factory – Gharghur, San Mikiel Fireworks Factory – Hal Lija, San Nikola Fireworks Factory – Siggiewi, Santa Marija Fireworks Factory – Ghaxaq, Santa Marija Fireworks Factory – Mgarr, St Andrew Fireworks Factory – Luqa. Participating Foreign Pyrotechnic Companies are Proformance Pyrotechnics – Australia; Vaccalluzzo Zio Piro – Italy; Nakaja Art – Poland and Nexos.

For the convenience of the public, ADT have extended the scheduled bus service until 12.30am on Thursday, 30 April and till midnight on Friday, 1 May.

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Maltese Fireworks Factories Rescue Plea

The Attorney General has appealed a landmark court judgment that could make a number of fireworks factories illegal, following on similar appeals by pyrotechnics enthusiasts.

In the appeal, the Attorney General said it was “disproportionate” that fireworks should be stopped in two feasts “just because one or two families’ swimming pools get dirty”.

“In Malta, we all put up with inconveniences because of the size of the island, like traffic, continuous construction, dust in the air, among other things but, since the Zammit Maempels live in a rural area, they don’t have to put up with a lot of the inconveniences,” the Attorney General said.

The case revolved around a complaint the Zammit Maempel family had made about fireworks let off close to their house for the feasts of St Helen and St Anthony in Birkirkara.

Permits for the fireworks had been issued, allowing them to be let off from areas closer to built-up zones than what the law actually stipulates. This could happen because the law defines inhabited area as a place where more than 100 people live. The family contested this and won the case and the judge declared the legal definition null and void because it discriminated against people who lived in sparsely inhabited areas.

In the appeal, the Attorney General said the judge cited rulings that were based on an examination between serious environmental pollution and the respect of privacy, family and home. The letting off of fireworks was certainly not serious environmental pollution nor was it continuous. Fireworks were very important to the island’s traditions and religion and were also an integral part of the tourism economy because they attracted tourists during feasts.

 Taken from  The Times of Malta

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Fireworks enthusiasts appeal safe distance ruling

Fireworks enthusiasts have appealed against a landmark court judgment that could make a number of established fireworks factories illegal.

The St Helens fireworks factory and the Malta Pyrotechnic Society have filed an appeal against a court ruling on March 26 in favour of a family that complained about fireworks let off close to their house for the feast of St Helen in Birkirkara.

Permits have been issued allowing fireworks to be let off from areas closer to built-up zones than what the law actually stipulates.

The reason was that the law defined inhabited area as a place where more than 100 people live.

However, the Zammit Maempel family contested this and won. Mr Justice Raymond C. Pace declared the legal definition null and void because it discriminates against people who live in sparsely inhabited areas.

In the two separate appeals filed yesterday, both the factory and the society contended that the judge had made an error when citing European rulings based on the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms.

The article cited says that “everyone has the right to respect for his private and family life, his home and his correspondence”. It continues that “there shall be no interference by a public authority with the exercise of this right except such as is in accordance with the law and is necessary in a democratic society in the interests of national security, public safety or the economic well-being of the country, for the prevention of disorder or crime, for the protection of health or morals, or for the protection of the rights and freedoms of others”.

The society claimed that the rulings cited by the judge in the judgment were based on an examination between serious environmental pollution and the respect of privacy, family and home. The rulings dealt with incidents that undermined the people involved because of the permanent and irreversible effects that had affected them whereas this was not the case with fireworks being let off, the society and the factory claimed.

They also pointed out that the family in question knew about the fireworks before they bought the house.

Article taken from The Times of Malta

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