Tag Archives: Firework Photography

Sparkler Art Photography

You Will Need
SPARKLERS (GOOD ONES!)
CAMERA
TRIPOD
BUCKET OF WATER

We all treat sparklers with a certain amount of disdain, as they are considered to be the ‘least pyro-esque’ item in most firework shop ranges. Indeed, they are frequently given free or form part of the ‘afterthought’ process … you know the one, the order arrives on the trolley and the customer will then check out the purchases on the pile before the inevitable ‘Do you do sparklers?’ comes. But in reality, they are a beautiful addition to any occasion whether fireworks are there or not.

Over the last couple of years, Sparklers have been introduced into Wedding celebrations but one of our favorite uses is for ‘Sparkler Art’.

Pop the camera on the tripod and pick your spot in front of the camera (it helps to establish your position whilst there is enough daylight.

Set the camera up: set the aperture to F8 and the exposure time to 25-30 seconds for best results

Dumbing down, especially for techo-phobes like ‘moi’, the exposure is set to 25-30 seconds and this is your ‘drawing time’ where everything done in front of the camera will form the final image. You can avoid a ‘tail’ or ‘trail’ on your image if you just continue to overdraw until the click if the shutter. One other tip, if you are writing your name, you need to do this backwards.

Sparkler art is only really limited by your imagination – check some out from the internet:

sparklers

We absolutely love sparkler art and have tried a couple of times with our point and shoot camera’s without much success, but having bought my hubby a Fuji Finepix S9500 for Christmas, we are only a few steps away from capturing some brilliant shots so we will keep you updated as this might be a project for the weekend.

Give it a try and we will feature the images on our website/FB page.

Happy shooting xx

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New Year Firework Photography

It’s a well established fact today that since the eve of the new millennium that people simply LOVE fireworks and it goes hand in glove that today technology is king and today, we can all capture more of those precious memories than ever.

Our society today is such that over 80% of the population have either a decent quality camera or a phone with a good camera facility to hand 24 hours a day. That said, fireworks are renowned for being an especially difficult medium to capture on camera which is one of the reasons we always advise customers who visit the website that whilst you can view every product in our range in video format, we will never be able to catch the full effects you actually view with the human eye.

A beautiful firework appeals to our most basic need for light and colour and whether you love them or hate them (and the majority of haters don’t like them because of their noise rather than the effects of the fireworks) getting a decent shot of a firework is in itself is a task not to be underestimated.

The problem is that unless you are supremely lucky the shots you believed were brilliant at Midnight on NYE actually in the cold light of day are a little underwhelming.

The key to taking a great shot is planning. Try the following (as recommended by professional photographers):

USE A TRIPOD OR FIRM SURFACE – set the frame you want to capture and leave it there. Keeping your hand steady for any length of time is not easy and will result in blurry pictures.

SHOOT IN MANUAL MODE – set the camera ISO to LOW (the experts recommend between 50 – 100) set the aperture to F5.6 for a crisp image.

SET SHUTTER SPEED – photography specialist recommend it to be at 2 seconds.

Turn off the FLASH.

Use MANUAL focus.

Try to position yourself upwind – this will reduce the amount of smoke you will have in the shot.

Take as many shots as you can – around 100 will actually give you around 5 absolutely cracking photographs.

Some android devices have a BURST option – engage this if it is a feature of your device.

Try to get some perspective into the frame be that a tree, a building like a church or sizeable house or even a person’s silhouette – it offers a better indication of the size of the burst.

There are some absolutely beautiful shots online, captured by all manner of cameras including some very old camera phone’s (my favourite all time camera-phone was the Samsung E770 – I took some amazing pictures of everything including a lunar eclipse.

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Firework Photography On Your Mobile

Fireworks must be one of the most beautiful things to see but when it comes to taking pictures of fireworks, it’s very much a game of point, shoot and hope for the best unless you have a few tips and hints to help you to capture ‘the perfect shot’.

Whilst firework photography is a challenge there are certain steps that can be taken to help to improve your chances. Check them out:

  • Some android and iPhones have a burst option by simply depressing the shutter and holding it down, it will take the worry out missing the shot.
  • It’s always a good idea to leave as much space as possible on your phone so before you visit your fireworks show – more memory, more photographs.
  • Try to get some perspective into your frame so if there is a person, a tree or a building in the background.
  • Hold your camera as steady as possible – best to use a tripod or something to rest on to avoid camera shake.
  • Take multiple shots at the early stages of the show and you should be well on track for the finale – just remember, the more shots you take the better chance of getting ‘the one’.
  • Don’t use the zoom, it’s pointless and will only use more memory and moving around constantly just affects the quality of the image. The zoom on a phone camera is simply to enlarge not to bring things closer to you and will automatically affect the quality.
  • On an iPhone, we recommend that you use the slow shutter cam – this is particularly useful when photographing sparklers as they allow time for the full image to be ‘burnt’ on. There is also a ‘fast camera’ which will take up to 800 shots a minute which is brilliant once you have ‘set up’ the camera for the display.
  • On some android phones, there are features like the night camera which helps to take photo’s in low light and a fast burst camera which will help to take over 30 frames per second (up to 1800 shots in a minute).
  • Avoid street lights as they will ruin your shots.
  • Position yourself so that the fireworks are in front of you and not above you.

If you take the time to get to know the full functionality of the camera facility on your phone (I know it’s a radical concept but you could even consider referring to the user-guide/instructions!). Knowledge is power so learn all you can.

Here are some fantastic shots taken from a camera phone and just remember, if all else fails, the video is brilliant…..just hit play below!

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