Category Archives: 5th November

YE OLDE SUSSEX BONFIRE SOCIETIES

The UK has it’s fair share of associations and groups but few can trace their origins back quite as far as the Sussex Bonfire Societies (including parts of Kent).  There are currently 35 operational Bonfire Societies; some are for the whole family whereas some are exclusively an ‘adult’ affair which has been running since the early 19th century.

In the early days, following the actions of Guy Fawkes and Robert Catesby, King James created an Act detailed as ‘An Acte for a publique Thanksgiving to God Almighty ever year of the fifth day of November’  in remembrance of the close escape from annihilation of him, his Lords and close relations who were gathered for the opening of Parliament.

In the early days, celebrations were very low key and subdued but became increasingly riotous and were eventually banned by Oliver Cromwell on the creation of the Commonwealth but re-established years later during the reign of Charles II but again, the celebrations were more hit and miss.

Bonfire Societies started initially in response to the burning of 17 protestant martyrs during the reign of Catholic Queen Mary Tudor.  They were originally just a bunch of men who went through the village at leaner times of the year (late autumn and winter) begging for food and where available, alcohol.  However, begging was a criminal offence and as such, to avoid detection, they would dress up as pirates or black up their faces leaving them free to do as they wished.  Hence the reason that today’s Bonfire Societies adopt a specific colour and type of costume ranging from monks and Saxons to jailbirds and Zulu warriors – the list is long and varied.

The members are fiercely proud and work tirelessly from one year to the next in preparation.  The events usually feature an effigy- once upon a time this would have been a very simple ‘guy’ but over the years, this has transformed into something a whole lot more thought-provoking.  Some of the effigies burnt have been controversial including several complaints about burning ‘The Pope’ and the numerous ‘No Popery’ signs carried by the revellers on their respective processions.

Last year some of the societies gained national recognition as they were featured on the BBC News.  Edenbridge B/S (Bonfire Society) burned an 11 foot effigy of the new Prime Minister Boris Johnson with his infamous mop of unruly hair, cycling helmet, Hawaiian shorts and a couple of red buses for shoes holding aloft an EU cake – the message being that you can’t have your cake and eat it – it seems that this message was not taken to heart as he steams forward with the UK’s plans to leave Europe.

Bonfire Societies across Sussex and Kent have had the proverbial ‘tilt’ at numerous high-profile individuals over the years including premiership footballer Wayne Rooney, outspoken former apprentice participant (and completely hateful woman) Katie Hopkins and even US President Donald Trump.

This year, there will be events from each of the remaining societies starting on 7th September to 16th November.  Here is a list of the dates of each:

  • 7/9/2019 UCKFIELD
  • 14/9/2019 CROWBOROUGH
  • 21/9/2019 MAYFIELD
  • 28/9/2019 BURGESS HILL
  • 5/10/2019 EASTBOURNE
  • 12/10/2019 NINFIELD
  • 19/10/2019 HASTINGS, HAILSHAM AND SEAFORD
  • 25/10/2019 ISFIELD AND LITTLE HORSTED
  • 26/10/2019 EWHURST & STAPLE CROSS, LITTLEHAMPTON, FIRLE, HEATHFIELD
  • 2/11/2019 NEWICK, BATTLE, EDENBRIDGE
  • 3/11/2019 ROBIN HOOD
  • 5/11/2019 LEWES, LINDFIELD
  • 9/11/2019 EAST HOATHLY & HALLAND, CHAILEY, SOUTH HEIGHTON AND RYE
  • 16/11/2019 ROBERTSBRIDGE, BARCOMBE AND NEVILLE

If you do get the opportunity to get to one of the dates, please remember that there are hot tar barrels being corralled up and down the street, fireworks and a torchlit procession and as such may not be suitable for young children.  Furthermore, as a result of their notoriety, particularly since the arrival of social media, these events are getting bigger every year and as they are held in small towns, the crowds can bring about traffic issues so be aware of this before you go along.

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AFTER DARK BONFIRE NIGHT SPECTACULAR

WHAT: AFTER DARK
WHY: SHEFFIELD’S PREMIER BONFIRE NIGHT SPECTACULAR
WHEN: THURSDAY 5th NOVEMBER 2015
WHERE: DON VALLEY GRASS BOWL, COLLERIDGE ROAD, SHEFFIELD, S9 2DF

Almost on our doorstep, one of the biggest Bonfire Night displays in Yorkshire returns once again but even bigger and better.

As visitors to our Head Office will be aware, we are based at Tankersley just two minutes from Junction 36 of the M1. As you might appreciate, we were a little busy on the ‘fab fifth’ (as we usually are) but last year but some of our staff watched part of the display from just outside our showroom, such is the magnitude of the pyro exhibition.

Attracting over 20,000 spectators this massive display in association with Heart FM will again feature music from some of the country’s top performers, a fun fair for all ages, an enormous bonfire lit at 7:30pm with fireworks set to music starting at 9.00pm with the event finishing at 10.00pm.

As well as the usual concession stands, drinks are available from over the road at Ice Sheffield which overlooks the event.

Gates open at 5:30pm for this all ticket event. Advanced tickets are available from the Sheffield Arena box office by phone on 0114 2228500, the University of Sheffield student union shop on Western Bank (0114 225 5555), S10 2GT and City Hall on 0114 223 3740.

On the night cash only payments can be made at Ice Sheffield on Colleridge Road and the Terry Street ticket booths.

Travelling to the venue couldn’t be easier as there are plenty of the trams on the ‘yellow route’ heading towards Meadowhall (from across Sheffield) which will drop you off on the doorstep with stewards on hand to direct you towards the entrance and increased buses on the night in expectation for the massive number of spectators attending, parking for those wishing to drive is available at Ice Sheffield and the surrounding areas, these as always are at a premium so plan to get there early for the better spots.

Alcohol is not permitted in the arena but there are a few bars around, just beware that stewards will refuse entry to anyone who they feel is “incapable” so take it steady.

Fireworks of any type are also banned in the arena this includes sparklers and Chinese lanterns, these if found will be confiscated and not returned on exit.

As we mentioned again we won’t be able to attend but if you are lucky enough to be going please send us your comments, photographs and video’s.

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The Guy Fawkes Story

I can still remember vividly the first lesson in Infant School with Mrs Glover about Bonfire Night, Guy Fawkes and all the shenanigans relating to the Gunpowder Plot. I was a very naïve 5-year old and was absolutely distraught to learn of this man trying to blow up the King. Then, my father showed me the fireworks for the evening celebrations and I was utterly convinced that fireworks were actually sticks of dynamite which was not much of a stretch considering the ‘plain’ packaging on actual fireworks in the sixties

Today, 400 years after the failure of the Gunpowder Plot, we still celebrate Bonfire Night but has some of the ‘legend’ become a bit of an afterthought as I believe that the conspirators, under the tutelage of Guy Fawkes, have become the hero of BFN when in fact we are meant to be celebrating the king’s reprieve!

There were five main plotters at the heart of the Gunpowder Plot:

Robert Catesby – The main man and the mastermind behind the plot. Intelligent and charismatic.

Thomas Wintour – A wheeler dealer and ‘a bit of a lad’. Good to have around as he could source just about anything.

Thomas Percy – Had ‘family’ connections which could get him closer to the Lords at the time.

John Wright – Reputed to be one of the finest swordsmen in the country.

Guy Fawkes – Soldier and explosives expert who had just returned from Spain.

In the very early 17th century, there were two primary types of gunpowder used; the faster burning musket gunpowder and secondly the slower burning cannon gunpowder but scientists today proved that due to the sheer volume of explosives they proposed to use, it wouldn’t have mattered much anyway.

Guy Fawkes was born in York in 1570 and was baptized into the Christian church just a few days old in the shadow of the imposing but exceptionally beautiful York Minster at the little St Michael’s le Belfry the local Parish Church. Sadly, following the death of his father when he was just 8 years old his mum married again but to a catholic and Guy and his mother converted to the new faith.

Years passed, and the young lad was incensed at the desperate plight of fellow Catholics in the Eighty Years War and determined that he would garner help for his fight to reinstall the Catholic Church in England with their help. Unfortunately, the anticipated help was never forthcoming so Guy (known then as Guido) returned to England with his friend Thomas Wintour.

Religious discrimination was still rife and was mainly thanks King Henry VIII and his split from Rome (in the name of the love of Anne Boleyn) and then Queen Elizabeth 1st (Henry and Anne’s daughter) continued if only out of need to protect herself as the majority of her ‘court’ were Catholic and the Recusancy Act was introduced whereby all Catholics were forced to worships in the Anglican faith. There were people being killed left right and centre in the name of faith and this was to continue for sometime to come. On the succession of King James, as a practicing Catholic and now head of the Country, the Papists quite innocently believed that things would improve dramatically and they would be able to return to supporting the faith of their choice. However, King James I was a very weak-willed man who wanted to please all of the people all of the time. He demanded that everyone take an oath denying the Catholic church (in particular the Pope) authority over the King of England and provided that everyone ‘outwardly’ were in support of the Monarchy and in particular the Church of England, they could tick along quite nicely. However, he was just one of a long line of monarchs who took it upon themselves to rid themselves of the faithful be that the Protestant’s as in the cast of the Marian Persecutions or the Catholics in the case of the Elizabethan ‘riddances’.

Guy Fawkes was of course born and grew to manhood during Elizabeth’s reign and he was so incensed about the persecutions and what he saw as senseless deaths of the Catholic faithful he left England and went to fight with the Spanish Catholic army where he stayed for 10 long years honing his skills as a soldier and gunpowder specialist.

Queen Elizabeth I died childless and the crown passed to her cousin James I who was described as ‘the most conceited man on earth’ by his courtiers who brought into question his ability to rule effectively but needs must and he took the throne in March 1603. He tried to keep the peace but ultimately the cost of the upkeep of the royal court and their properties came from the Church of England’s wealthy protestants, who demanded he denounce the Catholic faith and his speech outraged Guy and his co-conspirators to such a degree that they decided to ‘return him straight to hell from whence he came!’ and so, the plot to kill the king and his parliament was afoot.

The plan took shape and it was determined that the plotters should tunnel under the Houses of Lords and fill it with gunpowder before blowing it all to kingdom come.

However, London was an incredibly busy place and the idea to tunnel under was thrown out. However, whilst actually attempting to dig the tunnel, there was a noise from the very room they needed to gain access to and further checks showed that the under-croft in question was being cleared by the previous tenant, leaving it empty. Thomas Percy, a man with many ‘connections’ quickly arranged to rent it giving them the freedom to move about at leisure.

In the early 1600’s, everything was transferred in barrels so no-one would have thought anything strange about barrels being taken into a cellar for storage. They obtained the 36 barrels of gunpowder and everything was ready to go. Unfortunately, the best laid plans and all that malarkey, the conspirators received news that the state opening was to be delayed due the ever-increasing threat of the Plague from the original date in February to 3rd October to 5th November 1605. In light of this and to keep out of harms way, Guy is known to have left the country for a while returning to London in late August to discover that the gunpowder was spoilt or decayed so it once again had to be replaced. Oddly enough, tests today by scientists and historians have proven that whilst ‘spoilt’ gunpowder would not perhaps have worked in a musket, it would still have been effective as an explosive.

Obviously, the cost of replacing the gunpowder was cause for concern to such a degree that it became necessary to add another to the list of conspirators, Francis Tresham (Robert Catesby’s cousin) who could help gain funding for ‘the cause’.
Unfortunately, the more people you add into a conspiracy the higher the likelihood of discovery and it was this very man who is thought to have brought the whole thing to a dramatic end.

A letter was received by Lord Monteagle basically advising him against attending Parliament and recommending he retire to the Country out of harms way. The correspondence was received on 26th October and was shown to the Chief Minister, Robert Cecil, which later resulted in the search of all of the parliament buildings.

On 4th November, the replacement gunpowder was in place and they were set for the next day. Whilst doing some last-minute checks to the barrels, Guy Fawkes was discovered in the under-croft with a pile of firewood (hiding the gunpowder at that point!). He told the men leading the search that the firewood belonged to his master Thomas Percy and they left with this information to report back to their superiors. Unfortunately, the name Percy was cause for concern to the authorities as he was a known Catholic supporter so they returned to the undercroft later the same evening where once again, they came upon Guy who gave his name as John Johnson. He was searched and found to have in his possession a watch, touchwood and slow burning matches and subsequently, they moved the coal and wood to discover 36 barrels of explosives. The plot was discovered and it marked the beginning of the end for all involved.

Guy Fawkes was captured and questioned and in fact the King almost admired his resilience. But, despite constant questioning, it was eventually necessary for the King to offer permission for further torture of increasing intensity until the facts were known and the conspirators details gained. So to the rack – the worst device of its kind in England and the only one in existence in the country was in the Tower of London at the Lord Lieutenant’s lodge. Although we have to admire his fortitude, on 7th November his resolve was utterly broken and he confessed.

Of course, by this time, news about the plot was widely known and having secured property in the Midlands the remaining conspirators set out there to hide. However, with a couple of hundred kings-men after them, it was not to be long before they were discovered, having reached Holbeche House. Wright, Rookwood, Catesby and Percy were all killed in the ensuing fire fight and the remainder were injured and taken captive before being taken to the Tower.

Once the executions started, there was no stopping them. The men who had died in the battle at Holbeche were actually exhumed so that they could be beheaded and their heads displayed on spikes outside of the Houses of Lords.

In the end, they were all sentenced to be hung, drawn and quartered but both Guy and Keyes are known to have outsmart the hangman by leaping from the gallows. Guy died from his broken neck before being emasculated, disembowelled and beheaded and then for good measure (just to be sure you know) chopped into four pieces! Unfortunately, Keyes survived the fall just long enough to be brought to the quartering table.

After the executions, Parliament met later in January 1606 and passed a new law which was simply The Thanksgiving Act ensuring that services and sermons would be a regular feature over the coming years, remembering how close they were to Regicide. For the next 200 years, bells were rung and fires lit in thanks for the safe deliverance of the King which in years to come was to include effigies depicting the Pope or the Devil before they decided to have a ‘Guy’.

Here we are over 400 years later and it still seems a little odd that to this day, we use fireworks which contain black powder, which is virtually the same as gunpowder, in celebration of the foiling of the plot to kill the king.

Bonfire Night has certainly stood the test of time and the introduction of fireworks has just made us even more thankful that firstly, the celebration exists and secondly, that however well-intentioned, terrorism will never win.

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